The Top 10 Reasons to Walk the Whithorn Way Next Time You’re Thinking Camino

full Scottish breakfast

#1.  Scottish breakfasts

Haste Ye Back

#2   if you speak English, they speak the same language. Sort of.

Dunure Castle

The Black Vault in Dunure Castle

#3   place names – like the Waters of Luce – that sound like they come from The Princess Bride

Tatty Neeps and Haggis

‘tatties and ‘neeps (and haggis)

#4   ‘tatties and ‘neeps

Miles of Coastline Ken

photo: Ken Wilson

#5   miles and miles of coastal paths

No need to fight for space

#6   no need to fight for space on the trail or in albergues

Scones Jam Ken

scones and jam (for haggis, see above!)

#7   haggis is less disgusting than pulpo

St Ninian

stained glass of St Ninian at Glasgow Cathedral

#8   a saint who may have known the real King Arthur and St Patrick

Drumtroddan Standing Stones

Drumtroddan Standing Stones

#9   currags, castles, cairns, and caves (and neolithic standing stones)

Cask Ales

#10   real Scottish ales

Kissing Gate

And lots more: kissing-gates on the edges of cliffs, Norse-Scots stone crosses, Stone crossa destination where on a clear day you can see Ireland, England, and the Isle of Man, Arts & Crafts art and architecture, Mackintosh at the Willow menuscones with jam, the moors, you’re more likely to be soaked in cold rain than baked by unending heat, Burns cottage slogan

Christine walking through forest RainRobbie Burns, and…I didn’t even mention A.D. Rattray’s Whiskey Experience in Kirkoswald!

Rock-hopping the Whithorn Way

seascape near Denure

castle ruins near Dunure photo M. Anderson

“From Canada, are ye?” said the nice woman at the coffee shop. “Canada’s beautiful. I’ve been to Ottawa. We’re from here.” She shrugged, smiled: “It’s nice enough.” Seemed like a typically-Scottish understatement to me – this is the view they enjoy just outside the coffee shop. We were exhausted after a day of walking along the Whithorn Way along the ocean, rock-hopping just above the receding tide-line and scrambling over sea-algae. I’m here on a Concordia University Part-Time Faculty Association grant to see about the Scottish “Right of Responsible Access.” The key, said our Scottish host John Henderson, is that word: responsible.

near Robbie Burns underpass

viaduct walking near Robbie Burns museum Ayr  photo M. Anderson

It didn’t take long to see that the Scots, like Canadians, have some trouble with the  “responsible” part of their relationship with the natural world. The legislation establishing The Right of Access in Scotland is recent –  nine years old and part of the devolution of power to Scotland. As would be the case if we were fortunate enough in Canada to adopt similar legislation, the educational curve is still ahead. We saw lots of garbage on our shoreline scramble, even though the views were magnificent otherwise.

glove and sea

beach garbage south of Ayr photo M. Anderson

Maybe Scots, like Canadians, haven’t yet learned how beautiful, fragile, and important the natural world around them is. Finns, for instance, are taught to respect nature from kindergarten. Learning to enjoy berries, mushrooms, and views, and not disturb others, especially landowners, seems to be in Finnish DNA. In Scotland we passed what appeared to be an “Open Access” camp on the beach (see below, in the distance) and while the folks were practicing their rights, their garbage seemed to be a problem.

rock walking with campsite in background

pilgrims and Open Access camp in background photo M. Anderson

Still, one can hope. Local organizations had both cleaned up the last part of today’s walk, and had also set up trail markers. We hadn’t seen any markers on the first leg and had had to backtrack several times as a result. This is probably how Responsible Access is best lived-out: by community groups that operate locally to remind citizens to both get out on the land, and to leave no trace except their paths.

for more on the journey, see Ken Wilson’s blog Reading and Walking at https://readingandwalking.wordpress.com/

bluebells and ocean

Scottish bluebells near the sea photo M. Anderson