The Frenchman Trail 2018

classic fence photo of pilgrims

For five days we walked across the prairie. Thirteen miles was our “short day.” We watched for badger holes in the grass, spots where you could drop in to your knee and break a leg. We rolled under and climbed through barbed wire, not always successfully (I have a ‘pic’ in my left palm from grabbing a strand carelessly). Sometimes we walked silently. More often, in spurts, we chatted. During the day we baked in over-thirty temps and at night we shivered in our tents as it dropped to single digits. I was amazed at the wonderfully talented, eclectic group walking south with me. When they found out what I teach, I was challenged: “is this a pilgrimage?” That depends. We ended at a cathedral. We talked a lot about reconciliation, and tried to live it, at least a bit. We sang and laughed and formed a community that blessed each other. It was a holy time. For me, at least, that made it a pilgrimage.

Hugh and Matthew and sign

Huddled Together

It’s going down to 6 degrees tonight. Ten of us are huddled together in a gazebo, near Gravelbourg SK reinforced by tarps against the wind and cold. It’s a full moon. tipiskaw-pisim in Cree. We’re in the dark listening to drum songs and songs from a local theatre piece about the Cypress Hills Massacre. This pilgrimage is about the Frenchman’s Trail, but the suppressed history of the First Nations is never far from us.

CBC SK interview about the Right to Roam in Canada

quarry plaque one

CBC Saskatchewan’s Garth Materie interviewed me on The Afternoon Edition on August 2, 2018, about what it might look like to bring “The Right to Roam” to Canada, and specifically to Saskatchewan! (click on the link below to listen)